Going to Russia With Ukraine in the Heart

The Kiev Sanatorium 1983

Yalta year 1983 (USSR). The Kiev Sanatorium. Photo by flickr/morton1905

I love Ukraine; I was born here in Crimea. It was a territory of Ukraine, although many ethnic Russians reside here. Here majority of people speak in Russian, including me because I was born in a Russian family. Nevertheless, this never hindered my love for my country Ukraine. After all the protests, revolt and coup happened in my country, our land has voted to join Russia, the country with which we have no land connection at present, probably we will have a bridge, until then it will be like second Kaliningrad. This leaves me with a feeling of confusion, may be even some internal panic. Though I am not moving out of Crimea to other parts of Ukraine, I am still feeling some kind of uneasiness. It is difficult for me to accept the reality that my land has broken all its relations with Ukraine, country where I was born, the country where I spend my childhood and where I am pursuing my education. I am in a shock and unable to understand the condition.

Russia is not just big; it is a great country, which I love as a brother country. Ukraine and Russia and just to mention, Belarus has much in common in their history, a part of the mentality and cultural characteristics, but of course there are some differences, but not so much. Despite my Russian roots, my heart is Ukrainian and I want live in my country. I want to live in a peaceful Ukraine without radicals, without people who want to kill everyone who does not like them. I do not justify or approve of the fact that Russia invaded Crimean military bases. However, I always try to look objectively at the situation from both sides, so I understand that now there is a coup in Ukraine, which passed the power in the hands of nationalists and radicals.

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Unfortunately, Ukrainian authorities are unable to do anything to control the situation. Not only this, even students in University had stopped getting stipend from the government, which had almost hit the education in the country hard. Maybe if Russian troops had not entered in Crimea, radical forces would have come to Crimea creating bloodshed and anarchy. Now East Ukraine is also afraid of these radicals and asking for help from Russia. East Ukraine also has majority of Russian speaking population who do not support the coup in Kiev. There are nationalists of such level who even said that Crimea either should be with Ukraine or should be deserted, that is to eliminate all the people from Crimea.

People who have been living in Crimea before the collapse of Soviet Union have lived in four countries without even going out of Crimea. It is USSR, Ukraine, Republic of Crimea (for one day) and now Russia. In reality, Crimea is a multi-ethnic, multi-nationality and multi-religious republic. There are around 125 ethnic groups, mostly Russians, Ukrainians, Crimean Tatars (they are indigenous), Greeks, Armenians, Germans, etc. Even then, until today, there has never been any interethnic or interreligious strife in Crimea. We all lived peacefully and I hope we will live in peace in Russia.

Note: The author is a native Crimean living in Crimea. Here is a similar article by a native Crimean living in Russia

TWR Note: Articles under students’ column are written by school going students. Readers and commenters are requested to maintain healthy debate and to  avoid the use of improper language. Please stay away from directing personal attacks.

Hodenkova Kira
Hodenkova Kira is the student of TNU Im. V.I Vernadskovo, Simferopol.
  • Данила Володарский

    The Tatars are much less indigenous than, say, the Greeks mentioned…

  • Hitender Kumar

    A very touching article.. it expresses how a student from Crimea might feel about the current scenario..